Truck News

News  March 17, 2014 7:58AM

Truckers reject 14-point plan

VANCOUVER, B.C. -- A plan created with the intention of getting striking container truck drivers back to work at Port Metro Vancouver has failed to convince truckers to halt their strike.



VANCOUVER, B.C. — A plan created with the intention of getting striking container truck drivers back to work at Port Metro Vancouver has failed to convince truckers to halt their strike.

A proposal offered by the federal government, the B.C. provincial government and Port Metro Vancouver, the 14-point Joint Action Plan, promised drivers that if they returned to work, they would be consulted on changes to the port’s trucking licensing system, they would be offered mediation assistance to aid in the collective bargaining process with port-based employers, that regulated trip rates would increase 10% within the month, and that drivers would be paid the fuel surcharge.

But those promises rang hollow for members of Unifor-Vancouver Container Truckers’ Association (VCTA) and the United Truckers Association (UTA), who rejected the back-to-work call.

VCTA issued a statement saying the proposal didn’t address the right issues.

“After meeting with representatives of the port and the provincial and federal governments, container truck drivers say that basic concerns about minimum rates for all drivers have still not been addressed.

“Truck drivers have been raising concerns that long line-ups and wait times at the Port of Vancouver are costing truck drivers money and that rates agreed to in previous contract negotiations were not being honoured due to under-cutting.”

A spokesperson for the union explained why the drivers couldn’t respond in the manner government and port officials expected.

“We’re prepared to negotiate around the clock to end this dispute,” said Gavin McGarrigle, Unifor’s BC Area Director. “We’ve been trying for eight years to resolve these issues, and a negotiated agreement is the only sustainable solution. After that length of time, the port’s ‘trust us’ approach simply isn’t enough for our members.”

According to the UTA, a dialogue between parties on both sides of the work stoppage is still ongoing.

“UTA & UNIFOR organized a meeting to discuss the 14 points released earlier. After a detailed discussion both parties disagree and where dissatisfied with the points. Both teams have replied to the authorities with a conditional counteroffer to return to work. Now we wait for the authorities to reply back.

“So as of now the job action continues as is. UTA thanks all the membership for the unity and support. We have to make it right this time no matter how long it takes.”


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4 Comments » for Truckers reject 14-point plan
  1. ken webster says:

    The shippers and the Gov”t needs to talk to truckers all across Canada and act on the trucker concerns

  2. John Pringle says:

    The governments did not care about the truckers for years, they got away with threatening them, and now when the truckers are showing some backbone they have absolutly no idea how to handle the situation.
    The government gave control of apprenticeship programs to the companies, it is a mess. Over the road Trucking companies have near 100% turn over, and the government, will never look into that, the only thing they know how to do is give anouther tax break to the companies, change the rules so the companies, and the police, are exempt from the laws.
    Threats, and lies only work for so long, if we needed that we would watch the sun news network.

  3. Murray. F. says:

    Keep up the good work striking drivers!!! Your time doing this will pay off for you. The Port is getting ansy. Make them bleed. To many people at the port make way more than drivers.

  4. Lee says:

    If only a nationwide, Canada and US strike could be organized , and have EVERYONE join in instead of only a few and maybe, just maybe, someone would wake up and figure out that the industry they push around and regulate to death is actually vital and important. It wouldn’t take long guys, couple days tops before people took notice , and shelves empty and stations run dry, this government might just wake up from its slumber and realize we face some very real problems out here. Issues need to be addressed, wages and rates need serious attention and brought up to realistic levels , HOS needs to be streamlined, simplified and re written before this entire industry implodes. Nobody cares about it or us…these trucks are just a nuisance to most, and drivers just a pawn to be tossed around by some politicians sitting at a round table with nothing better to do than add pages of new untested ideas to our livelihoods. They do so without so much as consulting those that actually make this country move…. Totally unacceptable. Maybe, just maybe the time has come to show everyone that this industry is more than just some news story for the media to demonize …maybe a nationwide shut down opens some eyes to the importance trucking really plays in these countries. We hold all the cards here, not them, when as a group do we finally realize that. ? Always strike talk and action is only carried out by a very small few, and no one takes notice or even cares as it doesn’t affect anyone when so many wheels roll on not supporting a common cause. This wouldn’t have to be a long strike, a solid show of solidarity nationwide , for even a very short time would definitely bring this government back to the table to visit issues. Fix it now, before it’s too late ….because its already about to pass the point of no repair.

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