fuel economy

Fuel-saving, safety training should be refreshed: study

MONTREAL, QC - A recent study by PIT Group has found that training in fuel efficiency and safety are only effective when it includes refresher courses, while real-time in-vehicle technologies help to reinforce good practices. "While vehicle technology designed to improve fuel economy continues to advance, driver training is the element that has the largest impact on fuel consumption," says Yves Provencher, director - market and business development. "Our studies show that various ways to train drivers - including classroom, in-cab and simulator training - all have their advantages."

New engine oil categories making the grade

SANTA BARBARA, CA - A new generation of engine oils is in the North American market, passing a battery of tests developed for specific engine brands. But the work of convincing buyers about related features and benefits continues. The transition from CJ-4 to CK-4 and fuel-efficient FA-4 categories has essentially been seamless, says Dan Arcy, Shell Lubricants' global OEM technical manager, referring to formulas that were officially released in December. The chemistry was driven by ongoing calls for longer drain intervals, better fuel economy, lower emissions, and increasing horsepower, after all. And these are hardly the engine oils that have flowed through pumps in years gone by. Oxidation stability had to improve to handle higher under-hood temperatures. When oil oxidizes, it becomes acidic and thickens, Arcy explained during a media briefing in California this week. At the very least, that shortens potential oil drain intervals.

Saskatchewan association continues carbon tax fight

REGINA, SK - Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is retiring from politics, but the Saskatchewan Trucking Association is continuing his fight against carbon pricing - and also recommending steps that should be followed if such a tax becomes a reality. "We have supported the provincial government's stance on a carbon tax since the beginning, and that has not changed," said Susan Ewart, executive director, when releasing a related white paper on Friday. "The actions the federal government is planning on taking for backstop jurisdictions are not trucking-friendly and place an unfair burden on industry. Proper policy planning will prevent those actions." According to the association, a carbon tax would create an administrative burden, give U.S. carriers operating in Canada a competitive advantage, create budgeting challenges for trucking companies, and create inequalities between different transportation modes because of exemptions for marine and aviation.