Hours of Service

Small business ELD exemption ‘not likely’, analysts say

BLOOMINGTON, IN – The rollout of mandated Electronic Logging Devices (ELD) continues in the U.S. And while some trucking operations have secured temporary waivers, analysts at FTR Intel believe a bid to exempt small carriers outright is unlikely to succeed. The Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) has asked regulators to exempt small businesses making less than US $27.5 million in revenue, that don’t have an unsatisfactory safety rating, and have a safe record with no attributable at-fault crashes. It would last five years. An exemption like that – already rejected during the regulatory review process – would essentially gut the mandate for ELDs, and has been opposed by the American Trucking Associations and safety advocacy groups. Eighty-one percent of over-the-road trucking companies, and 93% of one-truck operators among them, have had no DOT-recordable crashes in the past two years, FTR notes.

CTA wants harmony on 11 issues

TORONTO, ON – Leaders of the Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) and provincial trucking associations have come together to identify 11 industry issues that could benefit from improved harmonization. The call is designed to support a new task force under the Council of Ministers Responsible for Transportation and Highway Safety, established in September 2016, and complements existing initiatives like the National Task Force on Weights and Dimensions. “This is a great opportunity for further collaboration between industry and government,” said Stephen Laskowski, president and Chief Executive Officer of the alliance. “CTA commends the provincial trucking associations for their efforts in contributing to our submission and looks forward to working with all interests in addressing the issues identified.”

U.S. rentals get 90-day ELD waiver

WASHINGTON, DC – The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has issued short-term rental trucks a 90-day waiver from mandated Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs), lasting until April 19. Trucks rented for 30 days or less will be able to use paper logbooks to record Hours of Service until the waiver expires. Carriers cannot simply replace one rental vehicle with another one within the 30 days, and must also have a satisfactory safety rating. They also need to report any collisions involving these vehicles within five business days. The Truck Renting and Leasing Association had known since December that a waiver was forthcoming, and is telling affected truck operators to print out the notice and carry it in the cab during the waiver period. Once this waiver expires, those who rent trucks for eight days or less will continue to be exempted from the ELD mandate.

Canada unveils plans to mandate ELDs, mirror U.S.

BRAMPTON, ON - Canada's federal government has unveiled plans to mandate Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) in trucks, largely echoing rules that officially take hold today in the U.S. Draft versions of the rules have been published in Canada Gazette Part 1, and once finalized are to roll out within two years. "This will make truck drivers less prone to fatigue," federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau said after announcing the proposed regulations. "It will make our roads safer." Canadian-based truckers heading across the border already have to comply with the U.S. mandate. "For a number of years, the Canadian Trucking Alliance has been pointing to research that shows a universal Electronic Logging Device mandate would have a direct and immediate impact on curbing behaviors strongly linked with higher crash rates such as driving over [their] prescribed limits of service, which leads to fatigue," he told a crowd of fleet executives and media assembled in a Trailcon Leasing service bay. "These Electronic Logging Devices can help commercial drivers and employers comply with existing Hours of Service regulations and help reduce the potential of driver fatigue. They also help drivers and employers on the administrative side of their work, and the devices' electronic records virtually eliminate the need for time-consuming paper logs." A two-year rollout will allow enough time to deploy the devices, Garneau added. "If we can do it quicker than that, that would be even better."

ATA applauds Electronic Logging Device mandate

ARLINGTON, VA - The American Trucking Associations is applauding the arrival of mandated Electronic Logging Devices in the U.S. "Electronic Logging Devices have been legislated, promulgated and litigated - with Congress voting three times in the past five years in favor of this requirement and a federal court rejecting a challenge to the rule. The time has finally come to retire decades-old, burdensome paper logs that consume countless hours and are susceptible to fraud and put the safety of all motorists first. The benefits of this rule exceed the costs by more than $1 billion, making it a rule the ATA can firmly support and easily adopt," said Chris Spear, the associations' president and Chief Executive Officer.

Data Driven: ELD’s can open door to big data

If knowledge is power, then Electronic Logging Devices (ELD) could be the most powerful device on the truck. Sure, the device at its most basic is responsible only for monitoring hours of service, but the potential of networking and integrating data is impossible to ignore. Why settle for simple electronic logging when it can serve as a total fleet management solution in a box? A friend of mine drives for a 10-truck floral distribution company and makes regular runs from Ontario's Niagara region to Chicago, Michigan, and western New Jersey. The picture he paints of his distribution manager would be amusing if it were not (most likely) true. The manager must be a fellow who grew up trucking in the '60s, and still listens to eight-track tapes of Red Sovine and Dave Dudley. The routes are badly planned, trucks are frequently diverted en route, the vehicles are always breaking down, and all communication with drivers is done over the -telephone. And he doesn't believe in ELDs. My friend says his boss will wait until the last possible moment to equip his fleet - and then only because he must.