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2001 was a year I surely won’t forget soon

It has long been a New Year's tradition for many to review the passing year and note how it forever changed our lives.In my case, looking back at the events of the past year, I personally have a lot t...


It has long been a New Year’s tradition for many to review the passing year and note how it forever changed our lives.

In my case, looking back at the events of the past year, I personally have a lot to be thankful for. It was just about a year ago when I contracted an illness that very nearly ended my shift as publisher of Truck News.

This rare disorder was diagnosed as myocarditis, a virus that attacks the heart, causing both it and the kidneys to shut down.

The fact is, I was lucky.

Many people who get hit with this never recover. If they do, chances are they need a heart transplant and/or regular kidney dialysis in order to survive. I managed to escape both.

Six weeks after this attack I was progressing nicely.

Now back at home, I was able to go to the bathroom myself (for any of you who have been in a similar situation, I’m sure you’ll agree that this is a huge accomplishment) and I was off dialysis.

It has been said time-and-time again, ‘How lucky we are to have our health.’

Having spent the first 44 years of my life having it I don’t think I really understood the true weight this statement carries. Losing it and getting it back, however, has made me realize just how valid it really is.

Nobody can predict the future and its seemingly senseless twists and turns.

It’s too bad all of us can’t, just for a moment, witness life as it would be without our health.

If we could, I guarantee we’d value each day as if it was our last.

For many of you, 2001 hasn’t been the most prosperous year. I have had the opportunity to talk to many of you at truck stops and shows across the country and I sympathize. I do understand your dilemma.

The cost to do business is going through the roof. But when you think things can’t get worse, just imagine waking up each morning to the sound of a heart monitor, or the pain of new tracks being inserted into an artery.

Many people do.

Yes, that experience gave me a lot to be thankful for: The people I work with (head honchos and all), my friends, my family, and the staff of Toronto General’s Critical Care Unit.

Without their help, care and unyielding encouragement, 2001 could have been the shortest year of my life.

I wish you and your family health, happiness and renewed prosperity in the New Year.

– Rob Wilkins is the publisher of Truck News and he can be reached at 416-442-2097.


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