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How It Works: The Scientific Explanation

GRIMSBY, Ont. - The following is a scientific explanation of how the Tadger works, as explained by John Mogford, president of Tadger International:...


GRIMSBY, Ont. – The following is a scientific explanation of how the Tadger works, as explained by John Mogford, president of Tadger International:

“The molecules in diesel fuel are positioned in a chain of carbon atoms, hydrogen atoms and sulphur atoms. The atoms cluster together in a ball with the outside atoms insulating the inside atoms from exposure to the eventual oxygen burn. At the point of combustion, swarms of oxygen atoms attack the carbon, hydrogen and sulphur atoms. Every place an oxygen atom contacts a carbon, hydrogen and sulphur atom, energy is released. Carbon atoms cluster together insulating inside carbon atoms from exposure to the oxygen atom resulting in some of carbon atoms going unburned and being blown out the exhaust as pollution.

As fuel enters the Tadger, the area of fuel is decreased resulting in an increase in the fuel velocity (Continuity Equation & Bernoulli Equation).

The fuel continues through the Tadger and passes over two baffles fixed at 90 degrees to each other. This section also increases the fuel velocity as well as creates an initial disruption in the viscous forces (laminar flow). The fuel then enters a fixed venturi configuration causing fluid inertia to further disrupt the already disrupted flow. The factor that determines which type of flow is present is the ratio of inertia forces to viscous forces within the fluid, expressed by the non-dimensional Reynolds Number.

Fluid flows are laminar for Reynolds Numbers up to 2000. Beyond a Reynolds Number of 4000, the flow is completely turbulent. The fuel flow exiting the Tadger exhibits a controlled turbulence with a Reynolds Number between 2000 and 4000. This controlled turbulence uniformly separates the clustered molecules. By exposing more of the fuel molecules with oxygen, more of the fuel will be burnt. The result of a better burn is less fuel needed to make horsepower and less unburned fuel being blown out the exhaust as pollution.


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