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Tips for PIP:

So you want to take part in the revamped Partners in Protection (PIP) program? Here are some tips from Ron Flowers, intelligence officer with Canada Border Service Agency (CBSA) on how to -and not to ...


So you want to take part in the revamped Partners in Protection (PIP) program? Here are some tips from Ron Flowers, intelligence officer with Canada Border Service Agency (CBSA) on how to -and not to -go about gaining acceptance into the program:

Don’t lie on the application form: “If you say you have security cameras when you don’t, that would be a lie,” said Flowers. “If you’re looking at getting cameras down the road, say that. It’s not a deal-breaker.” Flowers said all applicants must undergo a site visit prior to their admission into the program, and when the details on the application form prove to be false, “I don’t get a warm, fuzzy feeling.”

The sign says: Flowers said fleets should post signs around their facility that show ownership. “I’m a big believer in signs,” he said. Flowers has been known to visit carriers’ yards, walk right in and poke around their various trailers if there was no sign warning against doing so. In one instance, he walked right into a trailer and had access to a load of Corvette engines. The keys to the trucks in the yard were also easily accessible.

Secure the premises: Flowers said a carrier’s facility “should not be made of straw.” There should be a communication system in place so a driver can call for help in the event of an emergency. The yard should have adequate lighting and security. Fencing is not required, but it’s suggested. Traffic in and out of the facility should be monitored and there should be some sort of visitor’s log, which requires visitors to present identification. Cameras should be placed at key locations, including inside the foyer.

Review security: “If I can wander right in there off the street, so can anybody else,” Flowers pointed out. “How easy is it for someone to walk in, grab your most important asset and walk out?”The security expert said fleet managers should put themselves into the mind of a criminal. “Try to think like a bad guy.” Security reviews should be scheduled regularly, he said.

Trim the trees: Fences don’t do any good if there is overgrown brush around the perimeter, Flowers said. He pointed out a determined criminal will not hesitate to climb an overgrown tree and hop over the fence to gain entry to the yard.

Encourage drivers to speak out: Flowers said drivers are a great resource for enforcement agencies, because “They see a lot, they hear a lot and sometimes they talk a lot.”He said fleets should encourage their drivers to report suspicious activity. When a driver provides CBSA with a tip, it is noted on the carrier’s file, which is a good thing. “If I get a tip, that carrier’s file gets a check mark that shows they are still active in the program.” •


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