Truck News

News

Ad aimed at Trump takes swipe at Gordie Howe bridge


WINDSOR, Ont. – The Moroun family has stepped up their media campaign in their fight to have the Gordie Howe Bridge project come to a stop.

The owners of the Ambassador Bridge – which serves as one of the crossings between Windsor, Ont. and Detroit, MI. – have bought advertising space on the Fox News channel in the U.S. asking for permits for the second bridge to be torn up.

The ad was aired during the show Fox & Friends in the Washington D.C. market and aimed at U.S. President Donald Trump, who is known to frequent the American news channel.

Opening with the line “Dear Mr. President,” the ad takes aim at the Gordie Howe bridge saying it will cost the U.S. in jobs and steel that will go to Canadians instead.

Officials from the Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) have called those claims misleading.

Although the Gordie Howe bridge project is being paid for by Canada, it’s construction is being handled by workers from both Canada and the U.S.

The Windsor Star reports the WDBA did receive a waiver for the U.S. “buy American” policy – which says that U.S. infrastructure projects must only use materials made in the U.S., but that the waiver was granted because the project will be built on both sides of the border and is funded entirely with Canadian dollars.

The project has run into the Detroit International Bridge Company – owner of the Ambassador Bridge – and its owner Detroit billionaire Manuel “Matty” Moroun before.

Moroun launched several lawsuits, some which have been overturned, in an effort to keep the WDBA from obtaining the easements they needed to complete the landing areas on both sides of the bridge.

The ad appears to attempt to capitalize on recent tensions surrounding trade between Canada and the U.S., in addition to Trump’s “America First” policy which promised to bring back production of goods and services to the United States.

No statement had been released from the White House commenting on the ad as of press time.

The full ad can be seen here (courtesy of the CBC).


Print this page
Related Articles
TruckNews
TodaysTrucking


Have your say:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*