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Hino’s J-Series engine

With the 10/02 emissions deadline come and gone, a vast amount of misinformation regarding the future of heavy-duty diesel engines still exists. This is the sixth installment in a series giving manufa...


With the 10/02 emissions deadline come and gone, a vast amount of misinformation regarding the future of heavy-duty diesel engines still exists. This is the sixth installment in a series giving manufacturers a chance to explain their solution, in their own words…

It is a little known fact that Hino diesel engines met and exceeded the 1999 emission standards without penalty. Hino has designated the J-series engine to be the platform to carry Hino through to the 2004 emission standards and beyond.

Since the introduction of Hino’s current models in 1997, Hino engines have met and exceeded government emission standards. This was achieved through the use of the latest technological advancements such as electronic, direct fuel injection. Unlike our North American competitors who elected to go with computerized mapping systems, Hino elected to retain the Zexel fuel injection pump system which helped us meet the new stringent 1998 emission standards while at the same time offering a 10 per cent increase in fuel efficiency and increased horsepower.

Hino knew the installation of a precision fuel delivery system alone would not meet regulations…that’s why Hino’s J-series engine platform was introduced to North America as Hino’s answer to current and projected emission regulations.

From concept, the “J” Series was designed to meet North America’s most stringent emission standards. This engine is lightweight, with four valve, overhead cam technology including Hino’s famous, patented Micro mixing, piston and combustion chamber technology. The piston design is “Formula 1,” slipper type, ceramic coated for reduced reciprocal weight and friction.

New engineering technology in block design enabled Hino to cast the cylinders much closer together further reducing engine vibration and friction. Other ancillary items such as the fuel pump and vacuum pump are driven off the flywheel also contributing to reduced vibration.

Hino’s “J” Series four and six cylinder family of engines will meet 2004 emissions while at the same time offering improved fuel economy and increased horsepower. To achieve this we will be employing a Nippondenso “Common rail” fuel injection system as already used by Hino in other world markets.

– This article was provided to Truck News by Alan Masters, of Hino Diesel Trucks Canada..


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Truck News is Canada's leading trucking newspaper - news and information for trucking companies, owner/operators, truck drivers and logistics professionals working in the Canadian trucking industry.
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