Truck News

News

Remainder of Alberta farm mad cow-free

EDMONTON, Alta. -- The U.S. border remains closed to Canadian beef while the search for the origin of Canada's firs...


EDMONTON, Alta. — The U.S. border remains closed to Canadian beef while the search for the origin of Canada’s first case of mad cow disease in 10 years continues.

The search for the origin of the disease now spans Canada’s three westernmost provinces and 17 farms have been placed under quarantine. However there was some good news over the weekend. Test results indicated no other animals in the herd that was home to the infected cow were infected with mad cow disease.

“The rapid diagnostic test results from the originally quarantined cattle have all come back negative,” Dr. Brian Evans, chief veterinary officer for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency told local media. “We have seen nothing at this time through our testing results that would raise our level of concern. There is no evidence at this time to indicate the safety of Canada’s beef and beef products has been compromised.”

Still, the search continues to determine where the infected cow originated from – it’s suspected a farm in Baldwinton, Sask. was its birthplace – and just how did it contract the disease? Until those answers are discovered, the U.S. and other countries may remain hesitant to allow Canadian beef into their countries.


Truck News

Truck News

Truck News is Canada's leading trucking newspaper - news and information for trucking companies, owner/operators, truck drivers and logistics professionals working in the Canadian trucking industry.
All posts by

Print this page
Related Articles
TruckNews
TodaysTrucking


Have your say:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*