Paramjit Singh is squarely focused on safety

by Abdul Latheef

Talk about changing career goals! It seems Paramjit Singh has mastered the art.

He originally wanted to pursue engineering, then medicine, then dentistry before finally settling on agricultural studies.

In 1995, a bachelor’s degree from Punjab Agricultural University helped him land a job at a bank in his home state of Punjab, India, where he was given responsibility for farm financing.

“They liked my customer service skills. So, they moved me to regular banking,” Singh said.

That skill proved useful in getting a job at a bank in Canada when Singh and his family arrived as immigrants in 2001.

FSI Freight Solutions
Paramjit Singh. Photo: Supplied

But his mind was elsewhere.

“From Day One, I had the ambition to become a businessman,” Singh said.

His wife, Aman Preet, also got a break when a trucking company offered to train her as a dispatcher.

Singh, 49, said that was when the idea of starting a business focusing on safety and compliance struck him.

With a large number of his compatriots working in the trucking industry, he thought there would be no shortage of clients.

Soon PAP Trucking was born.

But that was a part-time job as Singh had continued working in banking. He also took several courses on risk management and safety compliance at the North American Transportation Management Institute (NATMI).

In 2006, Singh launched FSI Freight Solutions, assuming the role of president.

FSI offers a variety of safety and compliance services to trucking companies. It also helps entrepreneurs set up new trucking businesses.

Singh said many people working in the industry have no clue about the rules and regulations governing the sector.

“(Some clients) don’t even know under which regulations they are working.”

– Paramjit Singh, president, FSI Freight Solutions

When it comes safety and compliance, he said he is frank with clients, telling many of them their approach is wrong.

“They don’t even know, under which regulations they are working,” said Singh.

“This is my passion. I often tell them, ‘You must have a proper budget for training people.’”

He is also not happy the way Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) handles claims from truckers.  

He said it is time to reform the agency.

“I am saying this in a constructive way, not a destructive way,” Singh added.

FSI employs nine full-time staff, but his wife Preet is not one of them. She still loves her dispatcher’s job, he said.

Away from work and family, Singh spends time playing badminton or table tennis.

Singh and his wife live with their two children, Prabhjot, 21, and Ekjot, 16, in Brampton.

Prabhjot is interested in electrical engineering, but the younger son has not made up his mind yet, Singh said.

“He may or may not like trucking. He is a different man.”

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  • Ok i just started for a trucking company as a mechanic.
    Today my manager (which recieved his 310 T in 2019 ) asked me how I check drums. He told me i was wrong and he uses a brake caliper( which you use to measure dick brakes. I told him you have to measure the inside of the drum and it can’t exceed 120 thousand of an inch. He didnt know that. Now ive been in the trucking industry 30 plus years and I was dumbfounded how did he get his mechanics liecence, this isnt the only.thing he has not understood which we are trained on in tradeschool. The mechanic part of this industry has gone to hell, I even get to work with India exchange students, adjusting brakes working on trucks not even registered with.the college of trades. I dont think The college of trades or the Minestry of Transportation are doing thier due diligence to make sure people like this are not around in trucking industry. Also a couple of years ago I was asked if I wanted to buy my mechanics licence that $5000 could do it and I bet alot of people do just that