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Q: Do you think there should be a ban on hand-held cell phones for drivers?

ENFIELD, N.S. - Living in a fast paced world and trying to get a million things done in the course of a day can be quite hectic if not a downright pain-in-the-butt.Cellular telephones have alleviated ...


ENFIELD, N.S. – Living in a fast paced world and trying to get a million things done in the course of a day can be quite hectic if not a downright pain-in-the-butt.

Cellular telephones have alleviated some of this hassle making it easier for people to get in touch with loved ones, work, school, dispatchers, etc.

But often people can be seen driving with their heads glued to these little boxes, all the while distracted during the course of driving.

There’s no arguing these handy tools are essential for many truckers, but do they pose a threat to driver safety?

With many regions considering a total ban on hand-held cell phones while driving, Truck News visited the Big Stop in Enfield, N.S. to see what kind of impact such a ban would have on Eastern truckers.

Terry Stevens stopped his 1997 Freightliner to fuel up on his way back to Dartmouth, N.S. Stevens who hauls jet fuel for Irving thinks a ban would be a good idea.

“It would keep people from cutting me off and they might pay more attention to what they are doing on the road,” he says.

Willie Stratton, of H&C Trucking out of Dartmouth was headed to New Jersey with his 1998 Western Star when he stopped in Enfield. In his opinion, a ban wouldn’t be a big problem.

“There are a lot of alternatives to actually having to hold a cell phone to your ear while driving,” he says. “There are also hands-free mechanisms available.”

Mike Clarke, of Whitbourne, Nfld., believes there should be a ban due to the element of danger caused by talking on a phone while driving. Clarke who hauls lumber with his 1990 International for L.V. Hussey usually ignores his cell phone while he is driving.

“A lot of four-wheelers use them and in turn don’t concentrate on the road,” says Clarke.

Wade Reid, a driver for DMJ Transport was on his way to the Port of Saint John, N.B. when he stopped in for fuel. Reid who drives a 2000 International says a ban wouldn’t affect him at all.

“I never use them,” he says. “The headsets aren’t bad as long as they aren’t trying to find their phone on the floor.”

Rob Arthur, of Moncton, N.B., who hauls intermodal freight for Sunbury Transport out of Fredericton, says he wouldn’t be hit by a ban on cell phones, but hopes it might do some good.

“I don’t have one,” he says. “The four-wheel drivers might pay more attention to what they are doing instead of trying to call someone.” –


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