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Q: What changes do you expect to see in the trucking industry in 2002?

TRURO HEIGHTS, N.S. - With Christmas around the corner, and New Year's to follow very quickly, one has to wonder what the new year will have in tow for the trucking industry.While visiting the East Co...






TRURO HEIGHTS, N.S. – With Christmas around the corner, and New Year’s to follow very quickly, one has to wonder what the new year will have in tow for the trucking industry.

While visiting the East Coast Truck News stopped by the Irving Truck Stop in Truro Heights, N.S. to see what drivers suspected of 2002.

While most could not begin to predict the future, a lot of drivers had comments as to what they would like to see take place in 2002.

Driving instructor for the Commercial Safety College in Masstown, N.S., Mal Langille says he really doesn’t foresee any changes taking place. Although the Truro, N.S., native was quick to fill in that with the highways getting busier and more congested there weren’t enough places to stop and sleep. “There are too many trucks and not enough facilities. Hopefully the U.S. and the provinces will invest in more legal rest areas,” he says.

Future driver Glenn Ross, of Tatamagouche, N.S., is currently attending Masstown, N.S., Commercial Safety College.

He aspires to drive long-haul when he graduates. Ross, who worked in the lumber industry for a good portion of his career decided to make the switch to trucking in hopes of steady employment. “Maybe there will be more automatic trucks, which would be more efficient,” he says.

Dennis Santerre, who hauls animal grease for Enviro Express of St. Lambert, Que., in a 2001 Volvo wasn’t certain there would be much change. “Maybe more truckers, which would be a good thing, but other than that, I don’t know.”

Jim Arenburg, who drives a 2001 Freightliner hauling LTL freight for Fundy Express Transport Ltd. of Aylsford, N.S., does not predict any change in the future.

“They haven’t changed anything in the past 15 years, why would they change it next year? They don’t listen to us.”

For Wentworth Station, N.S. native Keith Heitkemper, his expectations of the year 2002 are hopeful. The Dexter Construction Ltd. float operator out of Bedford, N.S. drives a 1998 Sterling.

He says, “Hopefully there will be better roads and fuel prices will go down.”

Mike Thibodeau, a Canadian hauling general freight for Day and Ross, says he doesn’t expect a lot of change in the industry.

But that doesn’t mean he’s completely content.

“We definitely need some (change),” he concedes.

“Better pay for one thing and some more home time,” top the Christmas wish list of this driver of a 2000 Kenworth.


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