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A warm solution for large cabs

WINNIPEG, Man. - Detroit Diesel's Heat Exchanger provides fleets with an alternative to other forms of in-cab heaters and the company claims it also boasts several advantages over traditional heating...


WIDE RANGE: The Heat Exchanger can be installed on any truck, DDC says.

WIDE RANGE: The Heat Exchanger can be installed on any truck, DDC says.


WINNIPEG, Man. – Detroit Diesel’s Heat Exchanger provides fleets with an alternative to other forms of in-cab heaters and the company claims it also boasts several advantages over traditional heating products.

Mike Johnson, sales and marketing representative with Midwest Detroit Diesel-Allison in Winnipeg, Man., says sales of the new product are picking up as it continues to prove itself in the trucking industry.

The Heat Exchanger has only been on the market for about a year and he admits that as with all new products, it was initially met with some skepticism.

Key differences

Fleets that have tested the product, however, are now satisfied it’s an effective heating solution and are beginning to roll the Heat Exchanger out throughout their fleets, he says.

The Detroit Diesel Heat Exchanger differs from other forms of in-cab heaters in several ways, according to Johnson. Here’s how:

* It has no moving parts.

* It does not burn fuel.

* It requires virtually no maintenance.

* It is value priced compared to other products (less than half the cost, Detroit Diesel claims).

* And it turns wasted exhaust heat into useful energy, so it’s environmentally friendly.

The Heat Exchanger uses exhaust energy created by the truck as well as the vehicle’s coolant to generate heat.

It’s not designed for Class 8 highway applications or as a substitute to other forms of in-cab heaters that keep the interior warm while the truck is shut down.

Johnson says the Heat Exchanger is best-suited for step-van and P&D applications where the truck’s own interior heater may not be powerful enough to keep the large interior warm.

Recycles energy

For instance, courier companies in the cold Prairie Provinces would be an ideal candidate for the product as well as school buses.

About 30-35 per cent of the energy created by a typical engine is wasted, Johnson explains.

The Heat Exchanger uses that energy to heat the truck’s interior.

“The Heat Exchanger takes the engine and makes it more efficient,” he says.

The Heat Exchanger is installed anywhere before the muffler.

It’s comprised of durable stainless steel and about 20 feet of stainless steel tubing where the coolant is heated and re-circulated. It’s designed to provide uniform heating throughout the vehicle, Johnson says.

The Heat Exchanger also reduces start-up time, piston varnishing and engine wear while maintaining constant windshield defrosting capabilities, the company claims, adding there’s no fuel penalty or compromise on backpressure.

And the product can be fitted on vehicles with any type of engine under the hood, although it’s wise to consult with other engine manufacturers in order to to ensure it won’t affect the warranty, Johnson says.

“Any time you have something new there are always concerns about the impact it could have on warranty coverage,” he says.

Detroit Diesel and Mercedes-Benz officials claim the product can be used in conjunction with their engines without any impact on the engine warranty.

Besides checking the lines once a year, Johnson says there’s virtually no maintenance required. It’s also simple to install and can be easily retrofitted to any vehicle, he says.

For more information, give Detroit Diesel’s Johnson a call at 1 (204) 452-8244.


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