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Sask. boosts B-train weight allowances to match B.C., Alberta

REGINA, Sask. -- Saskatchewan has harmonized its B-train weight allowances with Alberta and B.C. to impro...


REGINA, Sask. — Saskatchewan has harmonized its B-train weight allowances with Alberta and B.C. to improve the flow of goods across western Canada.

An amendment to the Vehicle Weight and Dimension Regulations, 1999 allows B-trains to operate at 63,500 kg, up from a previous limit of 62,500 kg on the province’s most heavily-travelled highways. Alberta and B.C. already allowed 63,500 kg GVWs for B-trains.

“This weight increase is an example of the New West Partnership at work,” Saskatchewan’s Highways and Infrastructure Minister Jim Reiter said. “It’s a change specifically requested by the commercial carrier industry that will have tangible and immediate benefits, and it supports the goal of the New West Partnership in creating a barrier-free trade zone and investment climate in the three western-most provinces.”

“We’re very pleased to see the provincial government moving forward on harmonization of regulations for our industry,” Saskatchewan Trucking Association director Steve Balzer added. “The largest impact on commercial carriers is the ability to operate B-train combinations through the Saskatchewan-Alberta-B.C. corridor without having to reduce shipping weight.”

The increase is expected to provide carriers with 2.5% greater productivity.

Phase 1 of the new weight allowance goes into effect immediately on specified provincial highways as well as cities and urban centres located along those routes. Phase 2, to come later, will cover the remaining primary weight highways capable of supporting the extra weight.

The following highways are included in Phase 1:

Highway 1

Highway 2, from Assiniboia to its junction with Highway 11

Highway 2, from Prince Albert to La Ronge

Highway 3, from Hudson Bay to Prince Albert

Highway 4, from its junction with Highway 1 to Meadow Lake

Highway 5, from Saskatoon to Canora

Highway 6, from Highway 39 to its junction with Highway 1

Highway 7

Highway 9, from Yorkton to Canora

Highway 10, from its junction with Highway 1 to its junction with Highway 16

Highway 11

Highway 12, from Saskatoon to its junction with Highway 312

Highway 14, from Saskatoon to the Alberta Border

Highway 15, from its junction with Highway 4 to its junction with Highway 11

Highway 16

Highway 17

Highway 35, from Tisdale to Nipawin

Highway 39 from North Portal to its junction with Highway 6

Highway 41 from its junction with Highway 5 to its junction with Highway 6


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1 Comment » for Sask. boosts B-train weight allowances to match B.C., Alberta
  1. Les Wright says:

    LMAO! So, you figure productivity will be enhanced by adding another tonne to the GVW? This only proves my assertion that it’s never been about safety or any supposed concern for the rapidly deteriorating road system, it’s just about money… always has been, always will be. The DOT knows the psychology of operators/drivers, etc, and knows that they’ll still try and push the limit, allowing for even more opportunities to fine the ones that they catch. Trailer manufacturers will like likely increase payload capacity to allow for the new law, (and charge accordingly) too, so everyone’s looking to profit from this. It’s all about dollars, period.

    What’s next? Someone will figure out that increasing hours of service will increase productivity, so drivers can work even longer hours hauling more weight over increasingly deteriorating roads? Especially grain haulers like myself… you know you’ll never get any complaint from a farmer if you fill your trailers to overflowing, and work around the clock like they do at seeding and harvest. Trouble is, they only do that two times a year, for a comparatively short duration. We’re expected to do it year-round! Good deal for someone!

    The whole system’s a big joke. It’s all about what you can get away with and for how long. Translation: work harder, longer, for less money. That’s what is expected of the transport driver in the new world order.

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