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Clear Shot: Goodbye, but not good riddance

Saying goodbye is never easy, but given how fast news travels in this industry, you've probably already heard - I'm going to work for the Canadian Trucking Alliance, as vice-president of communication...




Saying goodbye is never easy, but given how fast news travels in this industry, you’ve probably already heard – I’m going to work for the Canadian Trucking Alliance, as vice-president of communications there.

James Menzies will be taking my place as executive editor of Truck News and Truck West, and I couldn’t be happier. He has been here longer than I, and has earned his stripes as a journalist and as someone who understands the industry and the individuals who make it up – not the least of which are the truckers themselves.

I also leave behind Adam Ledlow, a new addition to our editorial team, who is everything I hoped he would be – a great reporter, always curious, and very handy with a camera. Not to mention the sales, production and management staff of the publications – who are the backbone that give editorial the pages to put their work on.

It’s not easy to leave them all behind – but I’ll tell you, it’s a lot easier given that in truth I’m just finding a new way to work with them.

You see, my job as editor wasn’t just about fielding phone calls, hassling freelancers, writing stories and editing other people’s work – it was also about advocating for the industry to the public and government alike, pushing for the needs of the industry, for everyone from drivers to managers to manufacturers, and celebrating the industry – especially its quirks, which, as every good journalist knows, is what makes any subject fascinating.

Of course, when I started working here, I didn’t know that. I just needed a job, it paid fairly well and I thought it might be neat.

Who knew I’d be boring people at cocktail parties years later – telling them what they know about trucking and truck drivers is actually very little, and describing in detail (while their eyes glazed over) the always fascinating ins and outs of this very complex industry.

In my new job, I’ll be doing something similar – dealing with government for the most part. But not so much with truckers, whom I’ll miss for their earthiness, their sense of humour and their ability to see through B.S. Still, having worked here, I’ll be able to apply my knowledge of who truckers are and what they need to my new job, and do my best to serve them.

In truth I’ll still be doing what I like doing best – helping to get a better deal for the industry and its most important people, the people behind the wheel.Wish me luck.


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