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Truck stuck in low overpass

MONCTON, N.B. - For six hours, the latest tractor-trailer to become jammed under the CN Subway overpass on Moncton's Main Street was held firm - along with city traffic.The Oct. 3 crash marked at leas...


NO WARNING: Truckers would better notice a sign on the highway.
NO WARNING: Truckers would better notice a sign on the highway.

MONCTON, N.B. – For six hours, the latest tractor-trailer to become jammed under the CN Subway overpass on Moncton’s Main Street was held firm – along with city traffic.

The Oct. 3 crash marked at least the seventh time this year a large vehicle has been wedged under the low overpass in question. So far this year, tractor trailers, heavy equipment towed on flatbed trailers, a cube van and a large camper have snagged the bridge.

This most-recent victim was heading west through the downtown despite Main Street being clearly marked as a no-trucking route. Its driver either failed to notice or ignored a government-standard placard erected directly on the bridge that showed a truck with a red circle around it and a slash through it – the universal symbol for the phrase: No Trucks Allowed.

Serca Nasy’s driver Don Terry, a native of Moncton, N.B., says the accidents should bring two questions to mind. “Should there be a flashing sign indicating that the bridge is too low for tractor trailers or should some kind of warning be placed out on the highway at all points entering Moncton indicating the fact that there is a low bridge in the Main Street area?” he asks.

Terry feels truckers would have more of a tendency to notice the signs while on the highway because within the city limits, more attention has to be paid to four-wheel drivers.

The roof fairing on the tractor was shredded as it collided with the subway and the trailer was peeled like a banana.

Another important question, Terry adds, would be the extent of the damage to the bridge.

“We have to remember this has been stuck numerous times. Is this bridge still safe for trains to travel on? Or has anyone thought to check the tracks or are we just going to wait until something terrible happens, like a derailing?” he asks.

The abused subway has made out much better than some highway overpasses. Last month a piece of heavy equipment failed to clear a brand new overpass on the yet-to-be-opened Moncton-to-Fredericton highway. That overpass had to be destroyed and will eventually be rebuilt.


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