greenhouse gas

2021: The Medium-Duty Emissions Odyssey

TORONTO, Ont. -- The next round of greenhouse gas (GHG) regulations is due in 2021, but the model year of trucks affected by the rule will actually hit the road about two years from now. And while fleets that operate Class 7 and 8 heavy-duty trucks are already losing sleep over the rule, a significant share of the population operating medium-duty trucks doesn’t even know these rules exist. They’re the kinds of trucks operated by businesspeople and contractors who sees vehicle as a tool for some other business. Think electricians, landscapers, bakers, and plumbers. Their passion is their business, not the truck they use. "Back when the 2007 and 2010, soot and NOx emissions rules kicked in. We had to educate our customers on those changes, as dramatic as they were," says Brian Tabel, executive director of marketing for Isuzu Commercial Truck of America. "Most of them didn't know the change was in place, but they sure noticed the price jump between 2006 and 2010 [Model Year] trucks. Customers that had bought pre-emissions 2006 trucks and were shopping for another one in 2010 were shocked. They were mostly utterly unaware of the changes that had occurred over the past 10 years."

Saskatchewan association continues carbon tax fight

REGINA, SK - Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is retiring from politics, but the Saskatchewan Trucking Association is continuing his fight against carbon pricing - and also recommending steps that should be followed if such a tax becomes a reality. "We have supported the provincial government's stance on a carbon tax since the beginning, and that has not changed," said Susan Ewart, executive director, when releasing a related white paper on Friday. "The actions the federal government is planning on taking for backstop jurisdictions are not trucking-friendly and place an unfair burden on industry. Proper policy planning will prevent those actions." According to the association, a carbon tax would create an administrative burden, give U.S. carriers operating in Canada a competitive advantage, create budgeting challenges for trucking companies, and create inequalities between different transportation modes because of exemptions for marine and aviation.

Balance safety, fuel economy in emissions rules: CTA

TORONTO, ON - The Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) is asking the federal government to balance safety and the environment in proposed emissions rules which credit the fuel economy gains that can be realized with tires. "Regulating tire selection is a tricky business," says Geoff Wood, the group's vice president - operations. "Tires need to be spec'd for both safety and the environment. No one policy objective should trump the other." Environment and Climate Change Canada recently released its plans for Greenhouse Gas limits that will apply to 2018-29 Model Year equipment, effectively mirroring those unveiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A tire market survey planned by Transport Canada should help find a balance between tire traction and fuel efficiency when finalizing the emissions regulations, the alliance adds.