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Publisher’s Comment: We don’t need Hollywood to remind us of 9/11 horrors

I'm writing this month's column on the fifth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It's hard to believe five years have gone by since that tragic day.


Rob Wilkins

Rob Wilkins


I’m writing this month’s column on the fifth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It’s hard to believe five years have gone by since that tragic day.

In the fall of 2001, we worked out of the National Post building located on Don Mills Road. Their newsroom was one floor up and equipped with more TVs than most sports bars. That day, shortly after 9 a.m., you could hear a pin drop as we all watched the towers burn and events unfold.

Five years is a long time but for me, it’s not long enough. I, for one, have no desire to watch either of the latest blockbuster movies depicting the event.

It’s not like I’ve got my head buried in the sand. I just don’t believe someone should profit from re-enacting something as horrific and real as 9/11. Judging from the people I have talked to, I’m not the only one who feels this way.

My memories of that day are just that, mine. I don’t need nor want anybody else’s version.

I wonder if our older generation felt the same way when Hollywood started pumping out Pearl Harbor movies?

In all, there were 24 made, the first being released in 1942. Some of the more famous titles include ‘From Here to Eternity,’ ‘In Harm’s Way,’ ‘Tora, Tora, Tora’ and most recently, ‘Pearl Harbor.’ The earlier releases were primarily propaganda on behalf of the war effort.

You can see how Hollywood has capitalized on that attack. It also makes me wonder if 50 years from now we’re going to be subjected to blockbuster re-makes of 9/11 (although I’m sure I won’t need to worry about buying a ticket.)

Of course there have been countless other films depicting tragic historic events. The Holocaust, Hiroshima, Titanic, the list goes on. I suppose you could argue that these should never be forgotten and that Hollywood is simply making a history lesson entertaining.

Then again, the history lesson needs to be accurate. Some would say they haven’t had the greatest track record in that department.

Unfortunately, Hollywood will continue to have a bottomless suggestion jar when it comes to material. I’m not a doom and gloom kind of guy but we don’t live in a perfect world.

Hopefully, the future will prove that we have taken the right steps necessary to minimize events such as 9/11.

Rob Wilkins is the publisher of Truck News and he can be reached at 416-510-5123.


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