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Study suggests biodiesel reduces CO2 emissions

DALLAS, Texas - The National Biodiesel Board (NBB) shared early results of a study on the impact biodiesel has on CO2 emissions at the Great American Trucking Show.


DALLAS, Texas – The National Biodiesel Board (NBB) shared early results of a study on the impact biodiesel has on CO2 emissions at the Great American Trucking Show.

Two months into a six-month pilot with California-based States Logistics, the NBB says trucks using B100 biodiesel produce 78% less CO2 emissions than those running traditional diesel. The results are being collected and analyzed by Indigenous Energy, developers of an emissions-tracking system.

As part of the study, States Logistics is running seven trucks using either B5 or B99 biodiesel. In May and June, those seven trucks reduced their CO2 output by 16.5 tonnes, according to Indigenous Energy. Full results of the study will be released at the Mid-America Trucking Show in March, 2009.The current study uses soy-based biodiesel and measures the total CO2 involved from the time the crop is planted until it’s burned as fuel.

“The pilot program uses our patent-pending technology and reporting system with inputs from States Logistics’ over-the-road activity to show carbon and emissions reduction,” explained Peter Probst, president and director of research and development with Indigenous Energy.

The NBB is hoping the study will eventually be used to assist trucking companies in selling carbon credits under a cap-and-trade system. For now, it says it will use the data to arm biodiesel-using fleets with evidence of their environmental stewardship. The NBB says biodiesel has a 3.5:1 ration of energy gained to energy used to produce it, meaning for every unit of fossil energy required to produce biodiesel, 3.5 units of energy are produced.


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