fuel economy

Here Comes the Sun: Does solar have a role as an alternative fuel?

TORONTO, Ont. -- In some corners of North America, the idea of adding solar power to a truck or trailer is a no-brainer. You'd be forgiven for thinking that none of those corners are in Canada. That's mostly true, but it doesn't necessarily mean that solar has no place here. Just that you must be careful in assessing manufacturer claims about what their solar gizmo can actually do. Almost all of Canada gets an average of 4.2 hours of solar sunlight a day. Two areas -- a small stretch of the southern prairies and a little ribbon of central B.C. -- crank that number up to 4.5 hours. Compare that to as many six hours in Arizona, New Mexico, and a patch of southeast California. Doesn't sound like much of a difference, but it's a big deal. A 300-watt solar setup that can help to run a tractor's electric APU in that part of the U.S. would probably have to be a 600- or 800-watt setup for a rig running, say, a Toronto-Montreal-Halifax route. It also means that manufacturer claims can be rather idealistic if calculations were based on experience in warm and sunny parts of our world. There's no subterfuge involved here, but “your mileage may vary,” as they say.

Expect more Run on Less from NACFE

The North American Council for Freight Efficiency has unveiled a new look and redesigned website (www.nacfe.org) as it widens its focus beyond the fuel-saving equipment and components on the road today. The organization’s original goal was to promote the doubling of freight-moving efficiency. And the recent Run on Less event proved that target is “pretty practical”, said executive director Mike Roeth, during a briefing at the Technology and Maintenance Council’s annual meeting. Seven trucks participating in Run on Less proved an average of 10.1 mpg (23.3 L/100 km) is possible with existing technologies, and under real-world operating conditions. This compares to a national average of 6.4 mpg (36.75 L/100 km), and U.S. Department of Energy super trucks achieving 11-13 mpg (21.38-18.09 L/100km).

Fuel-efficient owner-operators benefit from in-cab coaching

If you talk the talk, you have to walk the walk.” Those words from three-truck owner-operator Jamie Hagen are one of his motivations for using the PedalCoach in-cab coaching system. No one would criticize Hagen’s fuel economy – he’s established a reputation for pushing his Mack Pinnacle to the brink of 10 mpg. However, even experienced drivers can benefit from telematics that provide real-time driving advice, and Hagen isn’t too proud to admit it.

Fuel-saving, safety training should be refreshed: study

MONTREAL, QC - A recent study by PIT Group has found that training in fuel efficiency and safety are only effective when it includes refresher courses, while real-time in-vehicle technologies help to reinforce good practices. "While vehicle technology designed to improve fuel economy continues to advance, driver training is the element that has the largest impact on fuel consumption," says Yves Provencher, director - market and business development. "Our studies show that various ways to train drivers - including classroom, in-cab and simulator training - all have their advantages."