border

Alliance submits wish list for NAFTA talks

TORONTO, ON - The Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) has officially submitted comments on cross-border trade to Global Affairs Canada, as governments prepare to renegotiate aspects of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The association's submission covers 11 related areas of interest including: in-transit truck moves, cargo pre-clearance, government investment at ports of entry, harmonization of security programs, the trend in rising cross-border fees, the movement of food products and related inspections, and e-commerce, among other topics. "Many of the comments by the carrier community contained in our submission are longstanding issues that have been impeding cross-border trade," said president Stephen Laskowski. "CTA is eager to work with Ottawa, Washington, and the business communities on both sides of the border to try and resolve these issues for the betterment of the economies in the U.S. and Canada."

Trump vows “America first” approach to trade

WASHINGTON, DC - Canada's largest trading partner has inaugurated a president who pledges "America first" policies on everything from trade to security. "From this day forward, it's going to be only America first. America first. Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs will be made to benefit American workers and American families," U.S. President Donald Trump said in his inaugural address on Friday. "We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our products, stealing our companies and destroying our jobs."We will bring back our jobs. We will bring back our borders. We will bring back our wealth and we will bring back our dreams," he added.

U.S. in-transit shipments are almost back

WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP) agency is moving forward on a pilot program aiming to simplify Canadian shipments in-transit through the United States. That is, loads originating in Canada and ending in Canada but travelling via the U.S. en route. In fact, CBP's In-Transit Manifest Pilot Program will work to restore the once common in-transit practice that was curtailed by post-9/11 changes to U.S. border security procedures. Nine Canadian carriers involved in the program will be able to use a limited set of data when crossing the border, easing the administrative burden significantly. According to a notice published in the U.S. Federal Register yesterday, "Test participants will submit electronically an in-transit manifest with a relaxed validation for the value data element and they will not have to provide the Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) number."

Canada-U.S. Truck Border Crossing Figures Reveal Surprises

WASHINGTON, D.C. --New analysis of data shows truck traffic between Canada and the U.S. has declined while it has increased between the U.S. and Mexico. The Journal of Commerce reports U.S. Transportation Department figures show since the second quarter of 2005, truck crossings between Canada and the U.S. decreased 16 percent but grew 19 percent between the U.S. and its neighbor to the south Also, truck crossings at both U.S. borders have increased since 2009, as the level with Mexico approaches what the U.S. has with Canada. It reports in the second quarter of this year, Mexican border truck crossings with the U.S. were up 2.6 percent year-over-year, while crossings at the U.S. Canadian border dropped 1.6 percent. Compared to the first quarter of the year, Canadian truck crossings increased 4.1 percent in the second quarter of 2015, while there was a 5.1 percent jump in June from May after falling in April from May. At Detroit, the second-largest U.S. truck border crossing, truck volumes increased 3.4 percent from the first quarter, according to JOC, but were down 4.6 percent year-over-year.